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Traveling Asia: A Foodies Guide to Popular Destinations

Posted on Posted in Chinese Food Steamboat, Japanese Food Steamboat Colorado, Sushi Restaurant Steamboat, Uncategorized

If you are like us, you love to travel and experience exceptional food. There is no better place in the world to do this than in Asia. If you are lucky enough to one day vacation and travel throughout the content, you will have an experience of a lifetime. For this post, we are going to recommend several popular countries to visit and what you should try to eat and experience during your travels! Of course, when you are not traveling abroad, you can have the taste of Asia right here in Steamboat Colorado at 720 Fusion Fresh.

Of course, there are tons of food and destination options to chose from in Asia. Below is our short list.

China

There is one single seasonal delicacy prized by Shanghai’s food lovers above all others: the sweet flesh and creamy roe of the hairy crab. In the first crisp days of early autumn, Shanghai locals start to pester their vendors at the wet market (the common term for a fresh meat and produce market), and, once hairy crab season starts in earnest, it’s a nonstop three-month-long feast.

FIONA REILLY

Japan

Visiting a Japanese market with a local expert is the best way to immerse yourself in Japan’s culinary culture.

Whether you want to visit Tokyo’s Tsukiji Fish Market, Kyoto’s colorful Nishiki Market, a depachika food hall – or even a neighborhood grocery store – a private market tour is the best way to get beneath the surface.

Modern sushi’s roots are based in Tokyo, and for the quintessential sushi experience get counter seats for a special dinner at one of Tokyo’s many sushi temples.

Thailand

A popular street food is Thai rice and curry at the Jatuchak weekend market in Bangkok.

Another dish that is particularly good here is white or brown rice with spicy stir-fried crabmeat and fresh yellow chillies. It’s an old-time classic. The sweet crabmeat is paired with yellow chillies (not other colors, for the yellow gives a particular aroma) and garlic.

Natalie Paris

 

Vietnam

Originating in China, pho tiu is a noodle dish that captures the essence of Vietnamese cuisine – salty, sweet, sour and spicy. Contrasting textures are provided by silky fresh rice noodles, tender lean shoulder of pork, the crunch of peanuts and crispy shallots. It’s aesthetically pleasing, too, when delivered to the table with the freshest tangle of noodles on top.

Huong Tran, guide for Urban Adventures’ Saigon Street Food by Night tour (urbanadventures.com)

 

Laos

Khao tom is an addictive steamed dessert sold on the streets and made with a mixture of sticky rice, black bean and fresh coconut cream which is then steamed in 4in-long banana leaf parcels. It can also be made with ground rice powder, and other ingredients can be substituted in the mix, such as peanuts. It’s cheap, filling and delicious, and widely available.

Claire Boobbyer, author of Footprint Vietnam, Cambodia & Laos

 

Malaysia

Penang is justifiably proud of assam laksa, the delicious fish noodle soup that may or may not originate there (variations can be found all along the coasts of northern Malaysia) but has since poured, in a mouth-puckering, spicy-sour tide, across the peninsula.

The sourness comes from tamarind or, sometimes, sour mangosteen; the wonderful marriage of textures from the soft noodles, the hot liquid thickened with flaked, usually poached fish and the fresh garnish – mint, cucumber, occasionally pineapple – sprinkled on top to round it off. Those pretty red slivers, meanwhile, are fresh chilli: if the sourness doesn’t get you, then the hotness surely will.

Nina Caplan, food and drink journalist

 

Cambodia

On som ang – grilled roasted bananas is a popular street food in Cambodia. Sweet bananas are encased in sticky rice that has been cooked with coconut milk and palm sugar, then the whole package is roasted inside a banana leaf on a mobile, open-air grill. The rice caramelises and forms a hard crust while the banana melts inside – a south-east Asian, street-side version of crème brûlée. A cold, fresh coconut juice is the drink to have with it.

Rebecca Luria-Phillips, food writer at realfoodcambodia.com

Have a Craving for Asian Cuisine?

Come visit us at our Steamboat Colorado location and experience traditional Asian cuisine. It’s the next best thing to traveling and experiencing Asia.

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